20-23 september 2017. Pécs - Hungary
Symposia
Novel molecular rules shaping the developing nervous system: reopening differentiation programs for therapeutic benefit (Alán Alpár & Tibor Harkány)
Novel molecular rules shaping the developing nervous system: reopening differentiation programs for therapeutic benefit (Alán Alpár & Tibor Harkány) 2017-09-22 - 10:30-12:30
Venue: Conference Room F08
The symposium presents mechanistic insight into novel mechanisms and signalling events in cell migration, lineage commitment, interactions with the immune system to define the contributions of individual neurons to functionally-segregated neuronal networks, ensuing pathologies and therapeutic implications.

MAIN ORGANIZERS:

Tibor Harkány (Chair)
Medical University of Vienna, Austria
Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden

Alán Alpár (Co-Chair)
National Brain Research Program of Hungary, Hungarian Academy of Sciences
Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary

 

SPEAKERS:

10:30 – 10:50 Igor Adameyko
Medical University of Vienna, Austria / Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
„Nerve-guided Schwann cells build the parasympathetic nervous system”

10:50 – 11:10 Alfonso Represa
Mediterranean institute of neurobiology, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University
„Development of the Neocortex  and Molecular mechanisms that underlie cortical network development & function in health and disease”

11:10 – 11:30 Alán Alpár (Co-Chair)
National Brain Research Program of Hungary, Hungarian Academy of Sciences / Semmelweis University, Budapest, Hungary
„Matrix metalloproteases in determining forward cell migration”

11:30 – 11:50 Michela Matteoli
University of Milan, Italy
„How the immune system shapes neuronal connectivity during brain development”

11:50 – 12:10 Eero Castren
University of Helsinki, Finland
„Neurotrophin signaling in cortical plasticity”

12:10 – 12:30 Discussion

 

SUMMARY

The complexity of the nervous system is achieved through an amazing variety of cellular differentiation programs whose cell-type specificity, timing, spatial confinement and dynamics determine the final computational power of the brain. Any insult that might disrupt the temporal or chronospecificity of a neuron’s differentiation program will manifest as congenital developmental deficit if the pool size of affected neurons is sufficient to trigger loss of function. During recently, a number of novel concepts in developmental neurobiology has emerged that likely redefine long-held views, particularly at the molecular level. These advances are not only significant since they describe mechanisms critical for the origin, motility, final placement or connectivity patterning of neurons but also because of significant offerings to rescue neuroplasticity by re-opening neuronal differentiation in the adult brain. This symposium will therefore thematically address: i) origins of peripheral neurons, particularly upon recruitment of multipotent Schwann cell precursors, ii) modes of neuronal migration shaped by classical neurotransmitters, iii) role of the extracellular matrix as a permissive conduit for migrating neurons, iv) contributions of the immune system, originally viewed as a protective mechanism against damage, distribution and functionality of tripartite synapses, and v) signaling rules during critical plasticity windows. Each presentation will also touch upon potential therapeutic applications.

Accordingly, our speakers will discuss cutting-edge results on molecular mechanisms and cellular interactions. Igor Adameyko will present principles of nerve-associated precursor migration to generate parsympathetic neurons. He will discuss cellular interactions to form parasympathetic ganglia in target tissues. Alfonso Represa will show how GABA and glutamate can cue neuronal migration. He will link emergent neuronal activity with migratory behaviors, as well as discuss causes of cortical delamination disorders. Alan Alpar will present a mechanism to remodel the extracellular matrix, thus determining the pace of forward neuroblast migration. Through the use of genetic strategies, he will pinpoint Ca2+-dependent matrix metalloprotease mobilization as a determinant of extracellular matrix accessibility. Michela Matteoli will offer an in-depth insight into how the immune system impacts neuronal connectivity in the eveloping brain. Lastly, Eero Castren will discuss the powerful modulation of neuronal plasticity by neurotrophin signalling and its clinical impact on developmental programs of cortical neurons during adulthood. Thus, a comprehensive synopsis of developmental concepts will be provided in a cross-disciplinary setting to appeal for developmental biologists, neuropharmacologists, neurophysiologists and others.