20-23 september 2017. Pécs - Hungary
Symposia
Recent advances in nociceptive signalling: focus on temperature-, acid-, and light-induced pain (Alexandru Babes & Gábor Pethő)
Recent advances in nociceptive signalling: focus on temperature-, acid-, and light-induced pain (Alexandru Babes & Gábor Pethő) 2017-09-22 - 10:30-12:30
Venue: Conference Room 103
This symposium will address recent findings in sensory transduction of temperature-, acid- and light-induced pain in the peripheral mammalian nervous system with a focus on the roles of TRP and Nav channels.

MAIN ORGANIZERS:

Alexandru Babes (Chair)
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biophysics, University of Bucharest, Romania

Gábor Pethő (Co-Chair)
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, University Medical School of Pecs Medical School, Hungary

 

SPEAKERS:

10:30 – 10:54 Michael MJ Fischer
Center for Physiology and Pharmacology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria
„Tissue acidosis-induced pain”

10:54 – 11:18 Peter W. Reeh
Institute of Physiology and Experimental Pathophysiology, University of Erlangen, Germany
„Special voltage-gated sodium channels grant cold and heat resistance of nociceptive encoding – an overview”

11:18 – 11:42 Gábor Pethő (Co-Chair)
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, University Medical School of Pecs, Hungary
„Behavioural noxious heat threshold: molecular determinants, in vivo measurement and pathophysiological significance”

11:42 – 12:06 Alexandru Babes (Chair)
Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biophysics, University of Bucharest, Romania
„TRPA1 and TRPV1, key players in light-induced pain”

12:06 – 12:30 Kata Bölcskei
Department of Pharmacology and Pharmacotherapy, University Medical School of Pecs, Hungary
„Novel, somatostatin-mediated peripheral antinociceptive mechanism mediated by stimulation of capsaicin-sensitive nociceptors”

 

SUMMARY

Recent years have produced important progress in our understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms of pain and temperature sensing in mammals. Pain can be evoked by activation of a dedicated population of primary afferent neurons, nociceptors. Nociceptive nerve endings express receptors and ion channels involved in sensory transduction, among which TRP (transient receptor potential) channels and Nav (voltage-gated sodium) channels play a key role. Our symposium will describe how some of these channels are involved in generating the sensory perceptions evoked by noxious heat, tissue acidosis and ultraviolet light. Moreover, these channels are known to undergo functional alterations upon activation of intracellular signalling pathways, and we shall describe novel sensitization mechanisms involved in pathological pain states. Our symposium will describe multidisciplinary research, from investigations of molecular determinants of ion channel function, to behavioural work in animal models and even human studies. Novel in vivo methods for the study of heat-evoked pain in animals will also be presented.
Prof. Peter Reeh will discuss recent finding concerning the ability of specific voltage-gated sodium channels to allow nociceptive nerve endings to function in a wide range of physiologically relevant temperatures. Prof. Michael Fischer will present exciting findings concerning the mechanisms of acid sensing as revealed in psychophysical experiments. Prof. Gábor Pethő will discuss behavioural work which addresses the contributions of several candidate heat sensors to establishing the noxious heat threshold. Finally, Prof. Babes will describe recent experiments which revealed an essential role for certain temperature-gated TRP channels in mediating the light-induced pain in several diseases associated with cutaneous photosensitivity and also in clinical treatments such as photodynamic therapy. The session will deliver an overall comprehensive picture of the status of pain sensing, from molecular and cellular studies, to animal behaviour and culminating with psychophysical experiments in human volunteers. In conclusion, our work will provide insights into novel therapeutic approaches to address pain in a variety of pathological pain states and human diseases.