20-23 september 2017. Pécs - Hungary
Symposia
Multidisciplinary approaches to study the genetic basis of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases (Illana Gozes)
Multidisciplinary approaches to study the genetic basis of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases (Illana Gozes) 2017-09-22 - 15:00-17:00
Venue: Plenary Hall
By innovative and interdisciplinary approaches and methodology, including gene knockout, Crispr/Cas, digital polymerized chain analyses at the single cell level, advanced bioinformatics, we will show how to understand and combat autism and Alzheimer's disease toward better disease management and public benefit.

MAIN ORGANIZER:

Professor Illana Gozes
Tel Aviv University

 

SPEAKERS:

Professor Illana Gozes
Tel Aviv University
"Translational neuroscience: from the lab bench to clinical trials"

Dr. Idan Menashe
Ben Gurion University, Israel
"Advanced bioinformatics analyses reveal new insights into autism genetics"

Dr. Vlasta Korenková
BIOCEV Center, Czech Republic
"Digital PCR and single cell analysis toward better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases"

Associate Professor Radislav Sedlacek
BIOCEV Center, Czech Republic
"Transgenic mice to study neurodegeneration using Crsipr/Cas"

SUMMARY

Autism spectrum disorders, on the one hand, and Alzheimer's disease, on the other hand, affect large proportions of children and the aging population, respectively. Advances in molecular technologies, genetics and bioinformatics show promise toward better understanding and better management of these, sometimes devastating conditions. Using innovative and interdisciplinary approaches and methodology, including gene knockout, Crispr/Cas, digital polymerized chain analyses at the single cell level, advanced bioinformatics, we will show how the public can benefit from neuroscience research. Speakers include, Professor Illana Gozes, Tel Aviv University, Israel, focusing on translational neuroscience: from the lab bench to clinical trials. In particular, describing major advances on activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), a key gene linked to autism and Alzheimer's disease as a diagnostic marker, decreasing in the serum of at risk premorbid individuals in correlation with decreased cognition and as a drug target, with the ADNP snippets, NAP and SKIP accelerating ADNP protection in innovative cell free, cell and animal models.  Dr. Idan Menashe, Ben Gurion University, Israel, will tackle new high-throughput technologies that have revolutionized research of autism genetics with thousands of new variants and hundreds of genes being associated with the disorder, presenting new scientific challenges of interpretation and prioritization. He will introduce bioinformatics analysis of copy-number variations, identifying and ranking genomic loci associated with autism. An automatic scoring algorithm of 461 autism genes based on curated data of 2898 genetic variants from 889 scientific publications, a freely available tool, the first to aggregate data of different classes of genetic variants from various study types to arrive at a genetically-and-biologically-driven rankings scheme, will be introduced. Autism genes are longer and have less genetic variants of different types than non-autism genes, suggesting complex evolutionary forces, leaving a unique signature that can be used to identify new candidate genes of the disorder. The utility of bioinformatics approaches in gaining new insights into the genetic basis of autism and other similar complex traits will be emphasized. Dr. Vlasta Korenková, BIOCEV Center, Czech Republic will introduce Digital PCR and single cell analysis toward better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases. Associate Professor Radislav Sedlacek, BIOCEV Center will discuss the Crispr/Cas technology to generate transgenic animals and revolutionize neuroscience research. The session has broad appeal to a large audience as it goes from molecules, to genetics, from the single cells to a single gene, to genetically manipulated animal models and to clinical translation, aiming at currently unmet needs.