20-23 september 2017. Pécs - Hungary
Special events
History Corner (Kodály Centre)
History Corner (Kodály Centre)
Venue: Other Location
The History Corner is an exhibition of posters on the history of Neuroscience organised by the FENS History Committee. This particular corner at the FRM in Pécs is focusing on prominent Hungarian and Eastern-European scientists and will be displayed on screens.

 

The History Corner is located on the Ground Floor of Kodály Centre. For exact location please see our map.

Here is a list of the posters which will be displayed: 

A case report on the Pathogenesis of Parkinsonism, 1893
Sorin Hostiuc (1), Octavian Buda (2), Ana-Maria Zagrean (3), Leon Zagrean (3)
1. Dept. of Legal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
2. Chair of History of Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania
3. Dept. of Physiology and Neurosciences, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

Dr. Lazar (Laza) K.  Lazarević (1851-1891): The author who first described the straight leg raising test
Sanja Drača (College of Applied Sciences, Kruševac, Serbia)

Endre Grastyán (1924.02.25. – 1988.06.17.)
Zsófia Varga, Boldizsár Czéh

History Project: Rediscovering hibernation – Research of the Belgrade School of Physiology – 60th Anniversary of the death of Prof. Jean Giaja
Pavle Andjus, Andrej Korenić
Dept for Physiology & Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Serbia

János Szentágothai (1912 - 1994)
Zsófia Varga, Boldizsár Czéh

Kálmán Lissák (1908-1982)
Nikolett Szentes 

                             

 

FENS History Corner

by the History of Neuroscience Committee

 

Poster abstracts

1. A case report on the Pathogenesis of Parkinsonism, 1893 

Sorin Hostiuc (1), Octavian Buda (2), Ana-Maria Zagrean (3), and Leon Zagrean (3)

1. Dept. of Legal Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

2. Chair of History of Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania

3. Dept. of Physiology and Neurosciences, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania


One of the first cases suggesting an association between Parkinson’s disease and substantia nigra was published in 1893 by Jean Martin Charcot's pupils Paul Blocq and Georges Marinesco, who worked at Salpêtrière. The article described a 38 years-old man, with tuberculosis, who was admitted to the Charcot’s neurological ward because he showed signs of unilateral Parkinsonism. During the autopsy, the investigators found a tubercle that destroyed the right substantia nigra. As the patient had overactive reflexes on the left side and the symptomatology matched exactly the localization of the tumor, Blocq and Marinesco suggested the Parkinsonism to be more likely a complication of tuberculosis and not an incidental finding. We discuss here the contribution of these two authors to the elucidation of the pathology of Parkinson’s disease, and highlight how even a single case report may play an essential role in the development of knowledge in neurosciences.

Keywords: Parkinson’s disease, shaking palsy, substantia nigra, Georges Marinesco, Paul Blocq

 

2. History Project: Rediscovering hibernation – Research of the Belgrade School of Physiology – 60th Anniversary of the death of Prof. Jean Giaja

 

Pavle Andjus, Andrej Korenić

Dept for Physiology & Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology, University of Belgrade, Serbia

 

This poster presents the project aimed to elucidate and bring to a wider research community the work of the Sorbonne graduate, French-born Serbian scientist, Professor Jean Giaja (Ivan Djaja). Prof. Giaja was an excellent physiologist and experimenter and his research on hibernation and hypothermia published mainly in the 1950s in esteemed journals still needs to be rediscovered for its particular significance to modern brain physiology, cardiology and low-temperature physiology in general. 

 

In 1910 returning from Paris Giaja established the first Chair of Physiology in the Balkans and organized the first Serbian Institute for Physiology at the School of Philosophy of the University of Belgrade. Giaja became member of the Serbian and Croatian academies of science and doctor honoris causa of Sorbonne and associate member of the National Medical Academy in Paris. In 1955 the French Academy of Sciences elected him as associate member in place of deceased Sir Alexander Fleming. Giaja died 1957 in Belgrade during a congress held in his honour (among several In memoriams one was also published in Nature).

 

Giaja’s studies are still valuable from the standpoint of contemporary medicine and surgery, particularly the neurophysiology of hypothermia: the stimulating effect that occurs in the post-hypothermic state. Especially important for today’s organ transplantation field, he also noted that the survival and viability of isolated tissues and organs (such as the heart) was much more pronounced if hypothermia preceded surgical intervention. Examples of rare cases of contemporary research that fruitfuly employed Giaja’s principles in neurosciences will be also presented.

 

3. Dr. Lazar (Laza) K.  Lazarević (1851-1891): The author who first described the straight leg raising test

Sanja Drača


College of Applied Sciences, Kruševac, Serbia

 

In addition to being one of the leading and most outstanding physicians in Serbia of his time, Dr. Lazar K. Lazarević (1851-1891) was also an enthusiastic scientist, writer and translator. His professional career was tragically short (1879-1890), but, in those eleven years he authored seventy eight scientific papers and observations. He finished his medical studies at the Friedrich Wilhelm University of Berlin and earned the title of Medical Doctor of all fields of medicine in 1879. In 1881, he was appointed as the Head of the Internal Medicine Department of the General State Hospital in Belgrade in 1888, he was elected a Corresponding Member of The Serbian Royal Academy, and in 1889 he became the doctor of the Royal Court of the King of Serbia, Milan Obrenović. He died of tuberculosis in 1891. The greatest contribution of Dr. Lazarević to the field of neurology and to medical science in general is his description of the straight leg raising test. The article entitled "Ischiac postica Cotunnii- One contribution to its differential diagnosis" was published in Serbian language (in Cyrillic alphabet) in the Serbian Archives of Medicine in 1880. The article was translated to German language and republished in Vienna in 1884 in Allgemeine Wiener medizinische Zeitung. In this paper, based on six patients from his medical practice, Lazarević correctly explained that stretching the sciatic nerve is the cause of the pain during this straight leg raising test. He gave a full description of several maneuvers used to perform the test, and described the control test. Accordingly, his sign should not be known by other names, and that the straight leg raising test should have the eponym, Lazarević's sign.